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Developed editor and player for 360° video

The new tools were recently demonstrated in an online workshop. See video from the workshop at the bottom of the page for a detailed explanation of the tools.

The Editor

The purpose of the 360ViSi Editor, created by the Finnish 360Visi project partners Turku University of Applied Sciences, is to create a simulation by connecting short 360° videos. This is done by compiling nodes, the basic building blocks, together with actions that trigger the next activity based on the players choice.

The beauty of the tool is that it gives the user the possibility to create whatever construction the user needs or wants. Some editing is possible in the editor, for example, clipping and looping videos. What adds interest to it, are the features such as providing the player with additional information in the form of pictures of texts, a randomizer that chooses the next step on behalf of the player and questionnaires enabling to test the players’ learning.

The tool simply takes in the JSON files produced in the 360°ViSi Editor and publish them on the internet.

The player

With the 360°ViSi Player, created by another 360ViSi project partner, a Finnish company ADE Ltd, the simulation creator proceeds to the part of publishing the content.

The tool takes in the JSON files produced in the 360°ViSi Editor and gives the user an interface to play through the simulation.

360°ViSi Player works on a browser, enabling to publish simulations on the internet and use them with multiple different devices ranging from mobile phones to VR headsets. The idea with this tool too, is to offer a simple and user-friendly interface. The user, usually a teacher, gets a link that can be shared with the players.

Want the detailed explanation? See the video of the demo here:

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Safe learning with a patient surgeon

Imagine standing in an operation theatre and handing instruments to a surgeon. To nursing students, the impression can be nerve-wracking and may cause them to choose another area of specialization.

To guarantee that the future is not lacking nurses with competence to work in this demanding field, Turku University of Applied Sciences has created a virtual 360° game that supports the students’ skills in identifying surgical instruments.

Nursing students testing the VR instrument game.

The game gives the students a boost in their competence and showcases the reality of working in an operating theatre.

“When turning my head, I saw the very realistic environment. I believe this game lowers the threshold to work in an operating theatre,” says Jasmine Pitkänen.

Pitkänen, a soon-to-be-graduate nursing student. Along with her classmates, she gave an estimation of the learning experience. With a bit more practice on the game, Jasmine would be ready to jump on the deep end.

Learning by doing was a rewarding method for the students. Instead of reading books or watching videos and learning passively, the students appreciated active practicing and experiencing the lifelike situation. Or like Mikko Kinnunen put it:

The experience was concrete, authentic and very realistic. I improved my score after rehearsing just once. When you practice, you learn.”

The students appreciated that, unlike books and videos, the game indicated incorrect answers. This feature along with the possibility to retry were seen as big bonuses from the learning point of view.

“If I handed a wrong instrument, it was made clear, and I got a chance to try again,” said Riikka Mörsky.

Instead of having the instruments explained as a list in a book, the game showed all the instruments at one glance. When reading about the topic, it did not occur to her, how the situation would look like in a real setting.

“If I had played this game at the beginning of my studies, I might have chosen to practice in an operating theatre.”

Valtteri Hannila appreciated the safe learning experience. Despite handing a wrong instrument several times, the surgeon stayed calm, and the rehearsal continued. In the real-life, a surgeon might not be as understanding. Playing in front of others added, however, more stress to the situation.

During their nursing studies, the students had played a learning game before, but this was the first VR learning game experience. Based on their practicing on the Instrument game, both the students’ experiences and attitudes towards the learning method were positive.

See video and interviews of the students testing the instrument game.

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The police student case – using 360° video in education

Specific needs for simulation tools in Health Education

User guide for creating interactive 360° video

Process for creating interactive 360° video for education

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Company cooperation across borders – because of the 360ViSi project

That led to a demo with the Norwegian University of Stavanger and based on their recommendation, the Finnish project team from Turku University of Applied Sciences was keen to hear more about the company and its products.

ONsim offers its customers VR headsets and easy-to-use 360° training solutions mainly to the medical sector whereas Turku UAS is, as a part of the 360ViSi project, both creating new methods for nursing education and developing the 360ViSI Editor enabling practically anyone to create simulations from 360° videos.

With a mutual passion for VR and simulation, the meeting between ONsim and Turku UAS was a sparkling start to the cooperation. Both ONsim and Turku UAS teams are enthusiastic about developing not only their products but also each other’s ideas. With cross-fertilization in mind, both the project and the company are looking forward to future cooperation.

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The police student case

With help from University of Stavanger, the Norwegian Police University College has produced and started using 360° video in education with the purpose of boosting asset recovery behavior from police officers, both bachelor students and post graduate police officers.

Inger A. E. Coll, assistant professor at the Norwegian Police University College, explained that police students need to be able to identify valuable assets during search and seizure of properties when a crime is suspected.

In a digital meeting, Inger A. E. Coll shared the Norwegian Police University College’s experience with 360° video in education.

Learning about asset recovery

The 360° video simulation allows the students to move around in an apartment in search of valuable items. Before starting the tour, the students are provided with this context for the scenario: The couple living in the apartment are suspected of massive drug sales. They have no recorded income and receive social security benefits.

Placed in the apartment are expensive female accessories, jewelry, valuable art and wine, user equipment for cocaine and documents proving ownership of a horse and a yacht. It is up to the student to identify and assess them.

“The simulation is offered two times for the students. The first time, the goal is to boost their attention and stimulate reflection. Later in the course they do the same simulation but are then given added information about the items’ value, to increase the learning outcome,” Coll explains.

The second simulation session provides students with added information in order to increase the learning outcome.

 The simulation is not a compulsory part of the education, but since it was introduced, 90 % of the students have completed it, and their feedback is very positive.

360° live streaming

The second part of the workshop was called “Possibilities with 360 live streaming” and presented by Kåre Spanne, media engineer at the University of Stavanger.

Spanne talked about how 5G, the fifth-generation technology standard for broadband cellular networks, is enabling a new aspect for 360° video: live streaming.

In China, an intensive care unit (ICU) has started using live streaming of 360° video to enable family members to “visit” patients on the ward.  See the news report about the story by CGTN:

“I believe we will see live streaming of 360° video used in education in the near future. One opportunity is to use it to observe students while they perform specific procedures,” Spanne says.

More workshops to come

This particular workshop was hosted by University of Stavanger, and all the partners will take turns to host workshops where a larger audience is invited to take part.

“The Knowledge Alliance is all about sharing knowledge. The project partners have insight into other cases that could be relevant and inspirational to the 360ViSi project, so this is a perfect arena for us to learn and develop our project,” says Atle Løkken, project manager for 360ViSi.

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Simulation-based midwifery education in Malawi and Tanzania

Ingrid Tjoflåt and Bodil Bø (UiS) together with Dr. Jane Rogathi, Dean of the Faculty of Nursing at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College in Tanzania.

– The project’s overall aim is to implement simulation-based education to strengthen the capacity and quality of nursing and midwifery education in Malawi and Tanzania, says project manager Ingrid Tjoflåt.

She is a professor in nursing at the Faculty of Health Sciences and will be coordinating the project. Tjoflåt has extensive experience from research on quality and competence development in various international contexts and research on teaching methods focusing on digital tools.

For the past three years, Tjoflåt and Bø have been conducting a research project on simulation-based nursing education with partners in Tanzania and Madagascar. Together with an international project group, they are also involved in the 360ViSi project.

–We will use experiences from this and other relevant projects in our collaboration with Malawi and Tanzania, says Tjoflåt.

Read the full story here.

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Made art exhibition available in the pandemic – with 360° video

Photo: Screen Story

According to the team at Screen Story, this was a great opportunity to apply interactive 360° video to a real user case. With the help of 360° technology, they were able to make the exhibition into a digital version – open to anyone, for free.

Explore the exhibition

The exhibition is still available online, so feel free to visit it. Navigate around and have a look at this example of one of the many ways to use 360° video.

In contrast to a normal video, the interactive 360° video allows you to choose what you want to look at and where you want to go, just as you would if you attended the exhibition physically.

https://stavangerkunstmuseum.no/360/iskyene/

Behind the scenes

Have a look at how Screen Story made the interactive 360° video for Stavanger Art Museum.

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User guide for creating interactive 360° video

The document provides basic information on producing 360° video using consumer-oriented equipment. It will discuss what is important to know when shooting 360° video, like tips about equipment, camera settings and camera position.

You will also learn about what you can do post-production; such as editing and exporting the finished video. The user guide gives recommendations and descriptions of different kinds of hardware and software that can be used, with links to several video tutorials.

After reading this – you should have the information you need to get started. We wish you the best of luck!

Please download the document:

Questions about the user guide?

Please contact us!

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Searching for the best cases for interactive 360° video simulation

The 360ViSi projects proceeds according to plan – well almost. Erasmus+ project work usually entails face-to-face interaction and discussions over the table, but this is prevented by the ongoing pandemic. This week, the project partners gather in digital meetings four days in a row instead.

What makes a good case?

So far, a lot of work has gone into planning, researching available technology and mapping the project partner’s different competences. Now the time has come to find the right test cases.

– We are assessing what would be of most value to students, what kind of interactivity would possible in each case and which cases would give most impact with regards to reducing the need for physical training facilities, explains Mari-Linn Atterås Larsen from University of Stavanger.

A proposal for a standard procedure for describing the test cases has been made, which will also be discussed and completed during the workshop. This is done to ensure the same format and quality throughout the project.

Each partner gets the opportunity to present focus areas and dilemmas for production to each other, and with the technical video skilled partners following the discussion, the creative and visual perspectives are well taken care of.

The workshop takes place 19-24 October at 12-14 CET.   

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Zero surgical failures

Petteri Joenpolvi, CEO of company ADESANTE, a start-up established out of the 360ViSi partner ADE, presented extended reality (XR) which is a new technology covering virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and mixed reality (MR).

“Every year 310 million patients are going through surgical procedures, and 50 million of them are experiencing some kind of complications. In the US, for example, 4000 people are injured every year due to surgical failures, of which 33 % experience permanent injury and 7 % wrongful death,” he explains.

ADESANTE has developed XR solutions for viewing medical images, planning surgical procedures, training surgeons and medical students and support surgery.

The XR solution is used by University hospitals and General hospitals. It’s easy to operate and gives you a precise overview of the human anatomy. It’s perfect for planning a surgical procedure and give the surgeons a better understanding of how to avoid surgical failures.

“Through ADE, the 360ViSi project will benefit from the expertise also from ADESANTE”, says the project manager Atle Løkken.

 Petteri Joenpolvi’s presentation, is available on YouTube.

https://www.surgeryvision.com/

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Why 360ViSi?